“Dark Halo” by Shannon Dittemore

I’ve always enjoyed a good sci fi story.  
 
In the past my favorite have been time travel stories.  There’s just something about the idea of people being able to visit the Wild West or the Revolution or go back to make a difference somewhere that’s always fascinated me.
 
Dark Halo, Angel Eyes Series #3   -     
        By: Shannon Dittemore
 
 
My new sci fi favorite isn’t about time travel, though, but realm travel.  It’s the third and final installment in the Angel Eyes series, and it’s a fascinating look at what might happen if we had the eyes of angels – if we could see those heavenly bodies that God promises are all around us.

If we could see that, what might it look like?  What sort of spiritual battles are being waged all around us that we might never see?  I feel sure that theologians have whole parties where they debate that question, but Dittemore put an even more interesting spin on it – she made the sole human owner of that special vision a teenage girl in love with the orphan charge of an angel.

Doesn’t get much more exciting – except when that handsome charge has been kidnapped by Satan, and that beautiful all-seeing girl decides to go get him back.

That’s the premise of this story, and is a wonderful read.  I couldn’t put it down – I was completely drawn into the spiritual battle between demon Damien and the angels surrounding Stratus.  There was an extra layer of sub-plots in this book that weren’t present in the first, showing just how skillful a writer Dittemore is and just how well-planned the entire series is.

I think this series would make a great teen book club choice.  Obviously it’s more than one book, but it’s important to read all three to get the full scope of just who angels are and who we are in turn. I think that there are great debating options that arise from this plot and the potential to go back to the Bible and research just what it says about angels and their duties is huge.  In-depth discussions could really spring from this book.

Throughout the entire book, Dittemore’s writing style and ideas reminded me of Ted Dekker’s Circle series.  Not in any way has she incorporated his ideas, but her translation of the spiritual into a physical outcome is an idea that Dekker has used.  If Dittemore keeps this up, she’ll definitely be rivaling Dekker for the top sci spots on the best seller’s lists.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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