“Love in the Balance” by Regina Jennings

 

Molly Lovelace dreams of a life without cares in Lockhart, Texas. She also dreams of handsome wrangler Bailey Garner, her ardent but inconsistent beau. The problem is, with Bailey’s poor prospects, she just can’t fit the two dreams together.
 
Then mysterious stranger Edward Pierrepont sweeps into town-and her life-and for the first time Molly wonders if she’s met the man who can give her everything. But he won’t be in Lockhart long and while it certainly seems like he talks about their glorious future together, she can’t quite get Bailey out of her mind.
What’s a girl to do with all these decisions when love is in the balance? 
 
 
 
Love in the Balance contrasts begs the question: does forgiveness, does grace exist for those who make mistakes?  I’ve often thought that part of our society’s problem stems with everyone’s unwillingness to call others to the carpet when making immoral decisions; isn’t that how we end up voraciously watching celebrities’ personal drama play out on the evening news?  Yet Molly’s circumstance isn’t right, either – we shouldn’t judge others based on our perceptions of their actions, without having the whole story, or be unwilling to offer grace.  Love in the Balance forces you to consider what you might do with an uncertain future, family pressure, and limited options for providing your own livelihood.
 
At times reminiscent of The Scarlet Letter, many parts of Love in the Balance seem harsh.  Molly’s circumstances aren’t fair.  Her parents are cruel.  Her co-worker is catty.  The dramatic love triangle in which she’s snared may be pleasing others, but it’s confusing her.  Honestly, it sounds rather depressing, except … Jennings throws humor in at just the right time – a sweet glance, an amusing circumstance, a strange reaction from another – the perfect touch to lighten the mood and keep you guessing as to which suitor Molly chooses.
 
You will guess.  You will be wrong.  I never would’ve predicted this ending, and yet it was the perfect one for Molly.  It’s one that our society needs, too:  our mistakes do not define us forever.  They are mistakes, and if we are wise, we can use them to deepen our faith, strengthen our witness, and move on.  We can be forgiven.  Grace exists.
 
I loved Molly’s story because, sooner or later, for one reason or another, we all need it.
 
 
Regina Jennings is a graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University with a degree in English and a history minor. She has worked at The Mustang News and First Baptist Church of Mustang, along with time at the Oklahoma National Stockyards and various livestock shows. She now lives outside Oklahoma City with her husband and four children. 
 
Find out more about Regina at http://www.reginajennings.com/.
 
For more reviews of this book, go to the blog hop landing page here, or, strike out for your own balance and purchase the book.
 
I received a free copy of Love in the Balance from LitFuse Publicity in exchange for an honest review.
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